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Volos, Greece, video travel tourism
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Volos is a coastal port city situated at the center of the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from A...
Volos is a coastal port city situated at the center of the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from Athens and 215 km south from Thessaloniki. It is the capital of the Magnesia prefecture. Built at the innermost point of the Pagasetic Gulf and at the foot of Mount Pilio or Pelion (the land of the Centaurs), Volos is the only outlet towards the sea from Thessaly, the country's largest agricultural region. With a population of around 200,000, it is an important industrial centre, while its port provides a bridge between Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Volos is the third of Greece's major commercial ports, but also gains significant traffic because of its connection by ferry and hydrofoil with the nearby Sporades Islands, which include Skiathos, Skopelos and Alonissos. There are also connections to Limnos, Lesvos, Chios and Skyros. Volos is the newest of the Greek port cities, with a remarkably large proportion of modern buildings, erected in the wake of the catastrophic earthquakes of 1955, and including the municipalities of Volos, Nea Ionia and Iolkos, as well as smaller suburban communities. The economy of the city is based on manufacturing, trade, services and tourism, and with its improved infrastructure the city is increasingly dynamic. Home to the University of Thessaly, one of the most important in country, the city also offers a wide range of facilities for the organisation of conferences, exhibitions and major cultural and scientific events, together with international-standard sporting amenities. Volos participated in the Olympic Games, and as an Olympic City it helped to present a new face of contemporary Greece to a world audience. The city has also since played host to a succession of athletic events, such as the European Athletic Championships. It will host the 2013 Mediterranean Games. Modern Volos is built on the area of the ancient cities of Demetrias, Pagasae and Iolkos. Demetrias was established by Demetrius Poliorcetes, King of Macedonia. Iolkos, Iolcos or Iolcus, was the homeland of mythological hero Jason, who boarded the ship Argo accompanied by the Argonauts and sailed in quest of the Golden Fleece to Colchis. To the west of Volos lie the Neolithic settlements of Dimini, with a ruined acropolis, walls, and two beehive tombs dating to between 4000-1200 BC, Sesklo, with the remains of the oldest acropolis in Greece (6000 BC), and also the foundations of a palace and mansions, among its most characteristic examples of Neolithic civilisation. Byzantine Era - Byzantine Greece According to a Byzantine historian of the 14th century, Volos was known as Golos. The most widely accepted theory for the derivation of the city's name suggests that Volos is a corruption of the Mycenaean Iolkos, which had become distorted through the ages to become Golkos, later Golos, and subsequently Volos. Others contend that the name originates with Folos, who according to myth was a wealthy landlord of the region. - Modern Volos - Volos is a relatively new city, beginning its strongest growth in the mid 19th century where an insignificant Turkish hamlet used to lie. According to local evidence, the modern town was first established in 1841. One of its first known inhabitants was an Epirote, Nicolaos Gatsos; according to travellers of the time he laid the foundation stone for its first house. The locality of its castle was named Golos by Ottomans and locals, while Ano Volos was known as Gkolos, although some historians suggest Kastria of Volos. In 1830 Koumas referred to it as Iolkos; others also referred to it as Nea Demetrias, after ancient Demetrias. In 1858 the town had just 80 houses, most of which lay along the waterfront, approximately where Iasonos Street can be found today. After its incorporation into Greece from the Ottoman Empire in 1881, the town had a population of only 4,900, but grew rapidly in the next four decades as merchants, businessmen, craftsmen and sailors gravitated toward it from the surrounding area. In the 1920s a large influx of refugees to the settlement took place
Tags:     volos  greece  video  travel tourism  sea  coast  city  guide  

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